The History of Tattooing

A collection of photos, articles, excerpts, biographies, antiques and everything else relating to the history of tattooing.
  • Ask Archive Random Theme

  • hockey-teeth:

Sailor Eddie Evans 1962

    hockey-teeth:

    Sailor Eddie Evans 1962

    --- 2 years ago --- 24 notes ---

    fuckyeahirezumi:


Carp
The subject here is Horiyoshi III himself, as tattooed by his master Horiyoshi II. The scene is a fantasy of ocean waves and wind, eddies and whirlpools, all celebrating the persistence and fortitude of the heroic carp.

The Japanese Tattoo - Sandi Fellman

    fuckyeahirezumi:

    Carp

    The subject here is Horiyoshi III himself, as tattooed by his master Horiyoshi II. The scene is a fantasy of ocean waves and wind, eddies and whirlpools, all celebrating the persistence and fortitude of the heroic carp.

    The Japanese Tattoo - Sandi Fellman

    --- 2 years ago --- 528 notes ---

    vampireforestfiree:

“All high-ranking Maori were tattooed as a rite of passage into adulthood. When young men and women reached the age of 12 or 13, girls tattooed their chin and boys got a full-face tattoo…The ta moko artist would study a young Maori’s face for hours, even days, working out a design. Then he carved deep cuts into the skin with a bone chisel … Next he dipped the chisel into a mixture of burned kauri tree gum and caterpillars and tapped the sooty powder into the grooves in the skin. The pain a young Maori endured was so intense that friends and relatives would play flutes and chant poems to keep his mind off it. Sometimes the Maori would pass out…or quit, which shamed him for life….Once the tattoo artist was finished, leaves…were put on the cuts…process took months…the Maori was fed liquid food and water through a wooden funnel. Depending on where the tattoos had been placed, he might not be able to get up and move around…six months later the young Maori was usually fit enough to walk…”

    vampireforestfiree:

    “All high-ranking Maori were tattooed as a rite of passage into adulthood. When young men and women reached the age of 12 or 13, girls tattooed their chin and boys got a full-face tattoo…The ta moko artist would study a young Maori’s face for hours, even days, working out a design. Then he carved deep cuts into the skin with a bone chisel … Next he dipped the chisel into a mixture of burned kauri tree gum and caterpillars and tapped the sooty powder into the grooves in the skin. The pain a young Maori endured was so intense that friends and relatives would play flutes and chant poems to keep his mind off it. Sometimes the Maori would pass out…or quit, which shamed him for life….Once the tattoo artist was finished, leaves…were put on the cuts…process took months…the Maori was fed liquid food and water through a wooden funnel. Depending on where the tattoos had been placed, he might not be able to get up and move around…six months later the young Maori was usually fit enough to walk…”

    --- 2 years ago --- 30 notes ---

    athenaelectricco:

Tattooed by Waters

    athenaelectricco:

    Tattooed by Waters

    --- 2 years ago --- 16 notes ---

    tattoostudy:

Norman Keith Collins (January 14, 1911 - June 12, 1973) was a prominent American tattoo artist who was also known as“Sailor Jerry”.  Collins was born on January 14, 1911 in Reno, Nevada. As a child he hopped freight trains across the country and learned tattooing from a man named “Big Mike” from Palmer, Alaska. 
Collins entrusted his artwork to his two proteges, Ed Hardy and Mike Malone, both of whom have become prominent figures in their own right. Hardy, who turned down an MFT scholarship to Yale in order to pursue tattooing, is known for his artistic sophistication and large-scale tattoos. Malone, who designed under the name “Rollo Banks”, and was known for his conceptual boldness and distinctive designs, died in 2007.

Sailor Jerry Collins and Don Ed HardySailor Jerry:Treasure Chest

    tattoostudy:

    Norman Keith Collins (January 14, 1911 - June 12, 1973) was a prominent American tattoo artist who was also known as“Sailor Jerry”.  Collins was born on January 14, 1911 in Reno, Nevada. As a child he hopped freight trains across the country and learned tattooing from a man named “Big Mike” from Palmer, Alaska

    Collins entrusted his artwork to his two proteges, Ed Hardy and Mike Malone, both of whom have become prominent figures in their own right. Hardy, who turned down an MFT scholarship to Yale in order to pursue tattooing, is known for his artistic sophistication and large-scale tattoos. Malone, who designed under the name “Rollo Banks”, and was known for his conceptual boldness and distinctive designs, died in 2007.

    sailorjerry10cover.jpg

    Sailor Jerry Collins and Don Ed Hardy
    Sailor Jerry:
    Treasure Chest

    --- 2 years ago --- 7 notes ---

    tattoostudy:

Herbert Hoffmann (December 19, 1919—June 30, 2010) was a tattoo artist.
Dead at 90, he was the oldest active tattoo artist in the world. Working out of the historically eccentric Hamburg neighborhood of St. Pauli, he has left his mark—literally—on innumerable people for near close to a century.[1]

Herbert HoffmanMotivtafelen (Flash Designs)

Herbert HoffmanLiving Picture Books:Portraits of a Tattooing Passion 1878 - 1952

    tattoostudy:

    Herbert Hoffmann (December 19, 1919—June 30, 2010) was a tattoo artist.

    Dead at 90, he was the oldest active tattoo artist in the world. Working out of the historically eccentric Hamburg neighborhood of St. Pauli, he has left his mark—literally—on innumerable people for near close to a century.[1]

    hoffman01cover.jpg

    Herbert Hoffman
    Motivtafelen (Flash Designs)

    hoffman02cover.jpg

    Herbert Hoffman
    Living Picture Books:
    Portraits of a Tattooing Passion 1878 - 1952

    --- 2 years ago --- 10 notes ---

    Original Cap Coleman Rock of Ages flash

    Original Cap Coleman Rock of Ages flash

    --- 2 years ago --- 16 notes ---

    roxxtwospirit:

    Homage to the greatest female tattooer that has ever lived and one of my personal heroes:

    Whang Od (Buscalan, Philippines)

    When Whang Od was twenty-five, the man she was in love with died in a logging accident. Instead of looking for a new husband, she dedicated her life to tattooing and now sixty odd years later she is the last practitioner of an art form that many scholars believe is nearly one thousand years old. Whang Od is still tattooing in her nineties.

    --- 2 years ago --- 11,254 notes ---


    --- 2 years ago --- 22 notes ---

    James F. O’Connell was an Irishman who rose to reknown for displaying the tattoos he recieved while shipwrecked in the Caroline Islands. O’Connell was the first man to display his tattoos in such a way in the United States during the 1830’s.
The following is an excerpt from his self-aggrandizing book entitled ‘A Residence of Eleven Years in New Holland and the Caroline Islands: Being The Adventures of James F. O’Connell.’ The passage describes his companions reactions to being tattooed by the natice Caroline Island women. 

"I was too much engaged in my own agreeable employment to watch my comrade, but George soon let me hear him. He swore and raved without and attention to rule; the way did was profane, but not syntaxical or rhetorical. He wished all sorts of bloody murder to light on his tormentors; he prayed that the island might be sunk by an earthquake; hoped forth boats’ crews from a squadron of armed ships would land and catch the blasted savages tormenting the King’s subjects. All this amounted to nothing but to amuse the women; and even I could not forbear a smile. They suspended their work to mimic him, and mocked his spasmodic twitches of the arms and horrid gestures."

You can read the complete book here.
The above picture depicts O’Connell dancing for the natives in order to win their favor.

    James F. O’Connell was an Irishman who rose to reknown for displaying the tattoos he recieved while shipwrecked in the Caroline Islands. O’Connell was the first man to display his tattoos in such a way in the United States during the 1830’s.

    The following is an excerpt from his self-aggrandizing book entitled ‘A Residence of Eleven Years in New Holland and the Caroline Islands: Being The Adventures of James F. O’Connell.’ The passage describes his companions reactions to being tattooed by the natice Caroline Island women. 

    "I was too much engaged in my own agreeable employment to watch my comrade, but George soon let me hear him. He swore and raved without and attention to rule; the way did was profane, but not syntaxical or rhetorical. He wished all sorts of bloody murder to light on his tormentors; he prayed that the island might be sunk by an earthquake; hoped forth boats’ crews from a squadron of armed ships would land and catch the blasted savages tormenting the King’s subjects. All this amounted to nothing but to amuse the women; and even I could not forbear a smile. They suspended their work to mimic him, and mocked his spasmodic twitches of the arms and horrid gestures."

    You can read the complete book here.

    The above picture depicts O’Connell dancing for the natives in order to win their favor.

    --- 2 years ago --- 3 notes ---